Last edited by Brall
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Seedcorn maggot found in the catalog.

Seedcorn maggot

Arthur H. Retan

Seedcorn maggot

by Arthur H. Retan

  • 95 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture & Home Economics, Washington State University in Pullman, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Granivores,
  • Maggots

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by Arthur H. Retan].
    SeriesInsect answers, Extension bulletin -- 1225., Extension bulletin (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension) -- 1225.
    ContributionsWashington State University. Cooperative Extension., United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17614453M
    OCLC/WorldCa52912888

    Print book: National government publication: English: Slightly rev. June View all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Maggots -- Control. Beans -- Diseases and pests. Insecticides -- Application. View all subjects; More like this: Similar Items. this book Biology of the seed-corn maggot in the coastal plain of the South Atlantic states One of 24 books in the series: Technical bulletin (United States.

    Seedcorn maggot flies are greyish-brown and about one fifth inch long. The legs are black and it has bristles scattered on the body. Flies infested with an Entomophthora muscae fungus become bound to twigs, leaves, wires and other objects by their mouthparts. Infected flies are swollen and have pinkish bands on the abdomen. LEGUME VEGETABLES - SEEDCORN MAGGOT (ADULT) General Information General Information DECLARE insecticide is a microencapsulated synthetic pyrethroid insecticide that controls insects by contact and ingestion. DECLARE is intended for control of insect pests in alfalfa, canola, cole crops, corn, cotton, fruiting vegetables, legume.

    SEEDCORN MAGGOT: Delia platura, Anthomyiidae. ADULT: The light gray to grayish-brown fly is 3/16 to 1/4 in. long. Their wings are held crossed over the abdomen at rest. EGG: Narrow, less than 1/16 in. long, pale white eggs are deposited in soil cracks, under clods, or on decaying vegetation. The seedcorn maggot is favored by cold, wet soil with a high manure content. It spends the winter as a larva or a pupa in soil, plant debris, or manure and becomes active in the early spring. The adults-flies slightly smaller than houseflies-emerge from May to July .


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Seedcorn maggot by Arthur H. Retan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Seedcorn maggot is a seed and seedling pest of corn and soybean. Plant injury is especially prevalent during cool and wet springs. The larvae, or maggots, feed on germinating corn and soybean seeds or seedlings (Photo 1).

They can feed on the embryo, delay development or kill the plant. Infestations tend to be field-wide instead of grouped together like for many other pests.

Labels related to the pest - Maggot, Seedcorn. Toggle navigation. SEEDCORN MAGGOT, BEAN SEED FLY. Delia platura (previously known as Hylemya platura). This is the larva of a small fly related to the cabbage and onion maggots, and is a pest in many countries.

It was introduced to North America from Europe in the. If seedcorn maggots are suspected, carefully dig up the seeds in the row skips and examine them for evidence of seedcorn maggot damage. Damage may range from a few meandering tunnels in the seeds to the entire contents of the seed destroyed.

Cotyledons and first leaves of the remaining seedlings may be deformed or spindly. In corn, seedcorn maggots bore into the gerrninating seed, often killing the germ. Failure of seedlings to emerge is usually the first indication of a seedcorn maggot infestation.

Return to Table of Contents IDENTIFICATION. The adult stage of the cabbage and seedcorn maggots is a small (about 1/4 inch long), dark-grey fly that is similar in. Insecticides for Wireworm and Seedcorn Maggot Control in Corn; Insecticides for Wireworm and Seedcorn Maggot Control in Corn.

Updated. Febru Go to or other resource for additional registrations. *Consult product label for specific information and restrictions. The adult seedcorn maggot is Seedcorn maggot book small (5 mm) grey-black fly. These small white maggots feed on the swollen, ungerminated seed of vegetable crops and occasionally potato seed pieces.

Often Confused With N/A. Biology Life stages: eggs, larvae, pupae, adult flies. Occasionally, the seed corn maggot is Seedcorn maggot book pest of potatoes.

Advanced. Scientific Name Delia platura. Identification The translucent white maggots are small (seedcorn maggot is a small (5 mm, ¼ in.) grey-black fly.

These small white maggots feed on the swollen, ungerminated seed of vegetable crops. Poor stand establishment is often a symptom of infestation.

Seedcorn maggot is a seed and seedling pest of corn and soybean. Plant injury is especially prevalent during cool and wet springs. The larvae, or maggots, feed on germinating corn and soybean seeds or seedlings (Photo 1). They can feed on the embryo, delay development or kill the plant.

Infestations tend to be field-wide instead of grouped together like many other pests. The seedcorn maggot adult is a slender, light gray fly, about inch long; it is less robust appearing than the housefly.

The whitish eggs are slightly curved with their posterior bluntly rounded. Mature larvae range from to inch in length, are white to whitish yellow, cylindrical, and taper anteriorly. The editors would like to thank Dr.

William Johnson, former Extension Agronomist - Wheat and Feed Grains, for his significant contributions to this handbook. The seedcorn maggot is an early season pest of soybean. It may be more of a problem during damp, cool seasons and in manured or reduced tillage fields with decaying residue.

The seedcorn maggot is a pale, yellowish-white larva found burrowing into soybean seeds. Full grown maggots are legless, about 1/4 inch (6 mm) long, cylindrical, narrow. The seedcorn maggot is the larva of a small, light gray fly that is about inch (4 mm) long.

The whitish, legless maggots are about inch (8 mm) long and attack the planted seed of a number of crops during the winter and early spring months, particularly if there is a cold period that prevents quick germination of the seed.

Seedcorn Maggot, Bean Seed Fly. Delia platura (previously known as Hylemya platura). This is the larva of a small fly related to the cabbage and onion maggots, and is a pest in many countries. It was introduced to North America from Europe in the ’s and feeds on large seeds such as peas, beans and corn, and on seedlings and young shoots.

Photos by Debbie Roos, Agricultural Extension Agent. April Description and Biology of the Seedcorn Maggot Seedcorn maggots are the larval stage of a fly that infests the seeds and roots of many different vegetable crops. The cool, wet conditions this spring have been ideal for this pest.

Seedcorn maggots also prefer feeding in soils with high organic matter. Control. Seed-corn maggot definition is - a small yellowish grub with a pointed head that is the larva of a grayish brown two-winged fly (Hylemya platura), is native to Europe but now widely distributed in North America, and is typically a destructive borer in seeds and seedlings (as of Indian corn, beans, or melons) but sometimes attacks stems or roots of older plants —called also corn maggot.

Those small gray flies in the yard and on the shrubs, flowers and vegetables are mostly seedcorn maggot flies. This field crop pest was very common this spring and caused damage to an estimatedacres of corn.

The seed-damaging maggot stage lives in damp, high organic matter soil until growth is completed and the adult flies emerge. The adult flies are harmless but are often.

for a cooperative study of the relation of the seed-corn maggot to potato seed-piece decay. A complete account of the results of his studies has not been published.

In a preliminary discussion, however, Bonde (4), says: In laboratory tests, adult flies of the seed-corn maggot (H. cilicrura), caught in. Broccoli-favoring pests that attack plants include cabbage and seedcorn maggots, while flea beetles, wireworms, cutworms, and aphids affect seedlings.

Mature broccoli plants can fall victim to loopers, beet armyworms, diamondback moths, silverleaf whiteflies, and cabbage worms. The eggs hatch in 1 to 8 days.

The higher the temperature, the shorter the hatching period. The newly hatched maggots begin feeding on decay- l Hylemya cilicrura. ing plant or animal matter near the soil surface. If sprouting seeds are near, the maggots are attracted to them. When a maggot reaches full growth, in 10 to 16 davs.

Seedcorn maggot eggs hatch in days; most cabbage maggot eggs hatch in days at F. Young maggot larvae seek underground seeds, roots, and stems or decaying organic matter on which to feed.

Complete larval development requires weeks. Maggots then.The seedcorn maggot, Delia platura (Meigen), is an occasional pest of agronomic crops in Missouri. This insect is widely distributed throughout the temperature zones of the world. It was not discovered in the United States until This insect feeds on the seeds and roots of many different grain (e.g., corn, soybeans) and vegetable (peas, watermelons) ption and life cycleThis.Dr.

Higley was appointed an affiliate professor of entomology at ISU in His home institution is the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he serves as a Professor of Applied Ecology in the School of Natural Resources.

He is also a Visiting Professor since in the Dept. Fitossanidade, Sao Paulo State University- Jaboticabal, Sao Paulo, Brazil, and served as Adjunct Professor (